Life Slightly paperback cover

Absolutely beautiful. So moving and incredibly immersive. A gorgeous story – JOANNA CANNON

Thoughtful and touching, without shying away from some dark topics. Life, Slightly shows that there is a better way of living – HARRIET TYCE

I was deeply moved by this beautifully told story of love, forgiveness and finding your way.
LAURA PEARSON.

Compulsively readable like a thriller, but beautifully written like a Sally Rooney novel, this is a story I won’t soon forget. Heartwarming and heartbreaking at the same time, this book is certianly going places!
AWAIS KHAN

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Praise for Nigel Jay Cooper

Semi-finalist, Best Debut Author, Goodreads Choice Awards. Finalist, The People’s Book Prize for Fiction. Longlisted, The Guardian’s Not The Booker Prize. Call in nomination, The Booker Prize.

An author with a truly compelling insight into the human condition.
Siobhan Kennedy, Channel 4 News

Cooper has a rare knack for presenting flawed characters in a way that makes the reader care about them.
Love Reading UK

I was immediately drawn into Gavin’s life, marriage and past. As his story unfolded I was desperate to know how it would end… and how he was connected to Jackie, the unsettling woman he meets in the park one morning. Their meeting changes both their lives and Cooper weaves their lives together expertly. His characters are as real and flawed as your own friends and family might be. Are we truly being ourselves? Do we even know who that is?

More about Life, Slightly

Two strangers, one bench. Two lives, one lie.

When Gavin meets Jackie on a bench in the local park, he thinks she’s a stranger. She knows better. She’s connected to him in ways he can’t yet imagine.

She swore she wouldn’t do this again but it’s real this time. So real, she might do something reckless and tell him everything.

He’ll understand. It wasn’t her fault, not really. Perhaps he’ll forgive her, even if she can never forgive herself.

Poignant, emotional, darkly funny at times, it is a skilful exploration of human nature and how people make choices — good and bad — with long-reaching consequences. How small acts can send ripples through the years and how it is possible to make amends (and changes) even when they seem impossible.

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